Most Anticipated Games Of The Summer

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Cyberpunk 2077: Arguably the most highly anticipated game of the summer, and following another delay, it will be the most anticipated game of the holiday season, after which it will become the most anticipated game of summer 2021.

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Ghost Of Tsushima: In this ultra-immersive swan song for the PS4, players will take on the role of a samurai in 13th-century Japan for 30 minutes before dying of a preventable disease.

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Paper Mario, The Origami King: Continuing the series’ traditional use of humor and meta references, this latest installment is bound to be a hit among fans who insist on treating Mario like he’s some big fucking joke.

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Hunting Simulator 2: This is the sequel to Hunting Simulator.

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Deus Ex: While not a new release by any stretch of the imagination, Deus Ex now costs $5.98 and represents one of the few video games in history that is not a complete and utter disappointment.

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Super Mario Day Trader: Take control of a newly unemployed Mario as he delves into the high-pressure world of day trading from his basement office. The game features a co-op mode where a second player can take control of Mario’s wife, Toadette, whose role is to yell at Mario and tell him to get a real job so that the family doesn’t starve.

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Untitled Jonathan Blow Project: Details are scarce about this rumored surprise drop, but word in the industry is the gaming genius’s next title will simply be this lotus flower gently floating on a cool pond as the whisper of an autumn wind rustles its petals.

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Marriage Story: Divorce Court Dash: The latest platformer based on Noah Baumbach’s Oscar-nominated family drama tests your ability to dodge the arguments made by your former spouse’s attorney and escape the courthouse with at least partial custody.

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The Last Of Us Part II: There’s so much hype around this game that we don’t really have anything new to say about it. Instead, we’d like to use this time to educate you about Jean-Paul Sartre’s conception of existentialism, as most famously laid out in Being And Nothingness and the essay “Existentialism is a Humanism.” Principally, Sartre’s worldview centers upon two categories in phenomenology: being-in-itself and being-for-itself. This move sidesteps the long-simmering Platonic-Aristotelian tension between the Real being represented in an unattainable ideal versus intangible reality.

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To wit, Sartre propounds being-in-itself as the being of objects, a variety of being that conscious entities can only emulate. A chair, for example, merely is in and of itself. Conversely, conscious being—the being of humans like yourself—is defined precisely by its lack. Put simply, what rests at the heart of human experience is its capacity to perceive mental and physical objects in the world, whether these be emotions, sensations, or simply material entities. Hence, the existentialist credo that existence precedes essence. In other words, what defines our phenomenological experience is a sort of nothingness or lack of essence that makes way for the essences of the objects in the world to become perceptible, much as a vase’s emptiness might make possible the holding of water.

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We humans are conscious, but unlike a chair or a tree, we do not have a firm essence, one that would define what our existence must be. Rather, we have free will, an ability to incline ourselves toward and away from various aspects of conscious experience. One of humanity’s defining drives, per Sartre, is thus the sense of nausea, which he indicates as the understanding of the nothingness pervading one’s experience and the need to attempt to fool oneself into a “bad faith” conception of oneself as having a permanent essential core. Thus, a waiter may behave perfectly as a waiter would, structure his or her thoughts according to how a waiter should think about a restaurant, even dress precisely in a waiter’s outfit.

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Underlying this act, according to Sartre, however, is the simple fact that this individual still exists in a state of unmoored freedom, no matter how desperately they attempt to escape. How often we betray this fundamental truth by telling ourselves we are a parent, a gamer, a conservative, or a socialist, desperately attempting to evade the honest reality of ambiguity which we encounter day by day. Sadly, the most popular conceptions of Sartre’s philosophy elide the optimism and empowerment that drives his existentialism.

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The solution to this nothingness at the heart of human experience is not to despair, but rather to realize that one cannot attain anything essential and must exist—exist moment by moment, act by act, thought by thought! In this way, we are not heroes or villains in life, but can only behave heroic or villainous and to decide to do so in every second that we breathe. In the next moment and the moment after that, we have the capacity to reinvent and recreate ourselves as something entirely different.

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Indeed, what would heroism be, if one simply became a hero and remained that way unquestionably? If one were to never feel the existential dread of knowing that one could err into depravity or moral turpitude at any instant? Thus and only thus, accepting the nothingness within oneself and bravely venturing forth in the path of existing without the crutch of essentialism, can one truly embrace one’s freedom without fear.

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Also, if you’re really excited for The Last of Us Part II, the Deluxe Edition comes with a PS4 Dynamic Theme, a digital soundtrack, and a mini-art book from Dark Horse!

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